Pond Poem

With my back against a tree,
What a wonderful sight I see.
What terrific sounds I hear,
And to never realize a beauty was so near.

As the wind blows through the grass,
And upon it I let time pass,
As I sit under the shade,
Time simply seems to fade.

The brilliant blue sky,
With wide white clouds up so high,
With the birds flying by,
With the sun’s twinkle in my eye.

My, my oh my,
How I have never seen
Such a sight so serine.

So exquisite and divine,
How all the sounds intertwine.
The blerping of the fountain,
The chirping of the birds,
The whistling of the wind,
And the planes flying by.

Now to bring it down,
With a peaceful poetic device,
I shall explain all the things,
That to me seem very nice.

Brilliant blue sky,
With wide white clouds passing by,
With the waves flouting near,
With the sun’s twinkle in my eye,
All the blerping that I hear,

My, my oh my,
How I have never seen
Such a sight so serine.

The image I perceive,
Through this I try to convey,
Unless you see it for your self,
You must answer to enjoyment, “Nay”

Underneath the rippled reflection,
The fish swim to and fro,
This setting utters perfection,
What made these wonderful things,
I may never know.

It is coming to that time,
Where I must soon go,
But before I finish writing this,
There’s something you should know.

This poem has to follow rules
And a strict restriction,
To contain alliterations and refrain
With some assonance and repetition.

But as I see,
And as I write
I can not conform to be,
So the next few lines are written with spite:
Big blue brilliant sky!
With wide white clouds!
The blerp blerp blerp!
And the chirp chirp chirp!
Blerp Chirp Blerp Chirp!
With the wind in the grass,
And with the time that has to pass!


My, my oh my,
How I have never seen
Such a sight so serine.
What I have seen today,
Seems right out of a dream.







About Pond Poem

This was a poem that I had to make in my 11th grade English Class.
If I was asked to write a poem I would not see too much of a problem;
poetry should come form aspiration, not dictation. But in this case we had to follow
“strict restriction[s],/ To contain alliterations and refrain/ With some assonance and repetition.”
So this is why, “the next few lines are written with spite.”